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political world

Ethnicity

Poles,Jews and holocaust;A History of American Jewish Polonophobia Through the 1980's

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
Although this book was written almost 20 years ago, it retains its significance. Its author was one of the last surviving leaders of the Polish Underground state under German Nazi occupation, and was honored at Yad Vashem for his aid to Jews (p. 104). He not only gives a firsthand account of Polish-Jewish relations during WWII, but also traces many mischaracterizations of this history in the American press through 1989. The informed reader can also appreciate how little has changed since then. >>more...

The Jews of Europe Before the Second World War;The State of European Judaism. Has Inadvertent Insights Into Some of the Negative Aspects of Pre-WWII Polish-Jewish Relations,

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
The Jewish communities of both eastern and western Europe underwent many changes in the decades leading up to WWII, but the Holocaust has overshadowed them. Wasserstein helps the reader understand what the Jewish communities were like. >>more...

The modern history of Israel

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
This work touches on many issues, including Zionism, the attempts to synthesize Marxism and Jewish nationalism, developments in the State of Israel, and related topics. I focus on a few salient features >>more...

THE SOCIO-POLITICAL THOUGHT AND POLICIES OF THE POLISH RADICAL NATIONAL CAMP ABC 1934-1939;Interesting Facts. Many Myths Debunked,

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
RELATIONSHIP TO FASCISM AND NAZISM

The ONR’s detractors, notably the leftists and the Jews, have usually portrayed it as a form of Polish fascism, or imitation of Nazism. Nothing could be further from the truth. The ONR wanted a Poland that promoted Roman Catholic civilization, in opposition to the “two paganisms”—that of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union. (p. 68). >>more...

Thoughts of a Polish Jew: To Kasieńka from GrandpaAn Assimilated Polish Jew Tries to Fit-in with His “Polishness”. Armenians and Jews. Revealing Statements by the Author

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
The setting of this book is Galicia, beginning with Austrian rule and ending with the author’s flight from Poland in 1939, at the start of WWII. By this means, the author managed to escape the soon-to-be German-made Holocaust. >>more...

Jews and Poles Oppressed by the Tsar. Insights into Jewish Business Advantages. Jews Have Expelled Other Jews,

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
This work follows a lachrymose approach to the Jews of 19th-century tsarist Russia, but is also cognizant of the sufferings of the Poles. (My review is based on the 1970 reprint of the original 1892 edition). >>more...

Polish Tribes in Now-Ukraine Centuries Before Casimir the Great?

Wednesday, May 11, 2016
My review is based on the 1982 edition. This work is less about nations and early nationalism, and more about history in general. The author contrasts the emergence and function of nations in both Islam and Christendom, tabulating the essential features (pp. 288-289). The author comes across as rather abstract--even obtuse--in his thinking much of the time. For this reason, his reasoning is sometimes difficult to follow. >>more...

Jews and Warsaw :Litwaks and cetera

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

15-Year-Old Outdated Content. Very One-Sided Book. Crucial Information Omitted :Jedwabne massacre

Saturday, October 17, 2015
Readers, save your time. Contrary to media hype, this book is of little value. It is a translation of materials written way back in 2000-2001—with a few slightly more recent, all of which had been published in the 2004 Polish-language book, MY Z JEDWABNEGO. The authors have repackaged decades-old text, and essentially presented it to the unsuspecting English-speaking reader as something new and dramatic. >>more...

Hasidic Movement in Old Poland. Broad-Based Implications:Hassidim MAskilim

Wednesday, August 19, 2015
his is a very detailed work which contains much technical detail. The title, MEN OF SILK (Kitajcy), stems from the fact that Hasidim commonly wore silk in order to avoid wearing wool—in which there was the danger of some linen threads being mixed in with the wool threads. (p. 2, 61).his is a very detailed work which contains much technical detail. The title, MEN OF SILK (Kitajcy), stems from the fact that Hasidim commonly wore silk in order to avoid wearing wool—in which there was the danger of some linen threads being mixed in with the wool threads. (p. 2, 61). >>more...
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